C-13 Fencing
Contractors License

  Get Your C-13 Fencing License

  Livestream or In-Person Classes

  Or Purchase The Material And Study On Your Own

  Only Takes A Few Weeks

  Pass-Test Guarantee
. .

 

decorative fence

Fencing

Fencing is like oxygen.

It’s everywhere.

And if you work in fencing, you better get your license so you can take your own jobs and be own boss and stop limiting how much money you can make.

Everyone needs fences — businesses, construction job sites, property owners, homeowners.

Even you.

So what are you waiting for?

 

866-570-3648

How To Get Your C-13 Contractors License

So many boundaries — for businesses, homeowners, properties, construction sites.

So many types of fences — chail link, metal and steel, vinyl, wooden, iron.

Even PVC.

Point is, there’s plenty of work and opportunity out there for fencing contractors.

As you probably already know.

Which is why you’re here, wanting to get your fencing license.

To start, it’s as easy as giving us a call. Or you can continue reading for more information:

Requirements To Get Your C-13

1. Four years of journey-level experience.

2. You must be at least 18 years old.

3. You must have a valid social security or ITIN number.

4. Have a valid driver’s license or government-issued picture identification.

Furthermore, you must pass two tests w/ the state of California

California State Tests – Law and Trade

In order to receive your California Contractors License you must pass two tests that they will issue you.

One test is on trade.

The other is on law — construction law in general.

The TRADE EXAM is divided into four major sections:

1. Planning and Estimating (32%)

•Planning fencing projects

•Reading and interpreting plans

•Estimating fencing projects

2. Preparation and Post Installation (23%)

•Job site layout and marking

•Determining post hole dimensions

•Post and concrete footing installation

3. Fence, Gate, and Repair (32%)

•Chain-link fences and gates

•Agricultural fences and gates

•Wood fences and gates

•Ornamental fences and gates

•Vinyl fences and gates

•Metal cable fences and gates

4. Safety (13%)

•Personnel safety

•Cal/OSHA procedures•Environmental safety

And after you pass the trade test, in the same session, you must pass the law test.

We’re not going to break down the law test right here, but suffice it to say it’s pretty difficult and covers a range of topics from contract law to liens, bonds, stop notices, taxes, budgeting and more.

Contractor License School

We’re a Contractor License School and we have several locations in SoCal but we service the greater California area through our livestreamed classes and study material.

It’s our purpose to help you pass the Law and Trade exam by providing you with all the study material you’ll need and make the process of getting your license as easy as possible.

If all seems daunting right now, that’s okay.

We’re here for you.

Incorporation Options.

You’ll need to decide your business structure. You don’t need to decide right now. In our classes, we break down your options: from sole proprietor to S corporations to C corporations. You have a few options to choose from. But you will have to choose.

We typically (not in all cases) recommend corporations. With a corporate structure you can protect your personal assets and save money on taxes.

State Application

If you meet the requirements listed above and you’ve studied and you’re ready to take your state tests, you will need to submit an application to CSLB.

We help you fill out that application (to make sure you do it correctly so it doesn’t get kicked back) as apart of our services.

Once submitted, the state takes a few weeks to get back to you.

On that application, you must have an individual sign off (qualify it) verifying your four years experience.

Who must that person be? Glad you asked.

That person can be your employer (whether that be your current or former). That person can be a fellow employee (someone you’ve worked with). That person can be the President of the United States. (not sure about the last one — but it couldn’t hurt).

If you’ve been doing work self-employed you can have one of your clients sign the application.

Quick note: if you are doing your own work, self-employed (not working under a licensed contractor as an employee on payroll) then you’re definitely breaking the law and need to get your license ASAP.

Furthermore, if you’re working as a subcontractor and you don’t have your license, that is highly illegal. You must have your contractors license to do any work more than $500 — unless you’re on payroll (receiving W-2s) and working for a licensed contractor.

When Will You Get Your License?

It’s up to you. You get to set the pace.

After you submit your application, the state usually takes a few weeks to issue you your test date, which gives you a few weeks to study. Often our students will complete half of our classes and then submit their application — finishing our schooling while they wait to hear back from the state.

DO I NEED A BOND?

As in a James Bond? No.

As in a Surety Bond (also known as Contractors Bond). Yes.

Big yes.

But it’s nothing you need to worry about now.

In fact you can’t even get a surety bond until after you receive your license.

There are several small additional steps you will need to take to complete the process.

But, as apart of our schooling, we’ll walk you through those steps.

The Main Stuff

To reiterate, the main stuff is this:

You need to have four years of experience.

You need to enroll in a school to study for the state tests.

You need someone to sign-off on your application.

You need to pass the state tests.

Then there’s some small stuff.

Get your license.

Make money.

The end.

A little description of what you’re getting yourself into.

via CSLB.

California Code of Regulations
Title 16, Division 8, Article 3. Classifications

A fencing contractor constructs, erects, alters, or repairs all types of fences, corrals, runs, railings, cribs, game court enclosures, guard rails and barriers, playground game equipment, backstops, posts, flagpoles, and gates, excluding masonry walls.

Authority cited: Sections 7008 and 7059, Reference: Sections 7058 and 7059 (Business and Professions Code)